Get Process Id

Arguments

  • handle=None

Returns the process ID (pid) of the process as an integer.

If handle is not given, uses the current active process.

Notice that the pid is not the same as the handle returned by Start Process that is used internally by this library.

Get Process Object

Arguments

  • handle=None

Return the underlying subprocess.Popen object.

If handle is not given, uses the current active process.

Get Process Result

Arguments

  • handle=None
  • rc=False
  • stdout=False
  • stderr=False
  • stdout_path=False
  • stderr_path=False

Returns the specified result object or some of its attributes.

The given handle specifies the process whose results should be returned. If no handle is given, results of the current active process are returned. In either case, the process must have been finishes before this keyword can be used. In practice this means that processes started with Start Process must be finished either with Wait For Process or Terminate Process before using this keyword.

If no other arguments than the optional handle are given, a whole result object is returned. If one or more of the other arguments are given any true value, only the specified attributes of the result object are returned. These attributes are always returned in the same order as arguments are specified in the keyword signature. See Boolean arguments section for more details about true and false values.

Examples:

Run Process python -c print 'Hello, world!' alias=myproc
# Get result object
${result} = Get Process Result myproc
Should Be Equal ${result.rc} ${0}
Should Be Equal ${result.stdout} Hello, world!
Should Be Empty ${result.stderr}
# Get one attribute
${stdout} = Get Process Result myproc stdout=true
Should Be Equal ${stdout} Hello, world!
# Multiple attributes
${stdout} ${stderr} = Get Process Result myproc stdout=yes stderr=yes
Should Be Equal ${stdout} Hello, world!
Should Be Empty ${stderr}

Although getting results of a previously executed process can be handy in general, the main use case for this keyword is returning results over the remote library interface. The remote interface does not support returning the whole result object, but individual attributes can be returned without problems.

Is Process Running

Arguments

  • handle=None

Checks is the process running or not.

If handle is not given, uses the current active process.

Returns True if the process is still running and False otherwise.

Join Command Line

Arguments

  • *args

Joins arguments into one command line string.

In resulting command line string arguments are delimited with a space, arguments containing spaces are surrounded with quotes, and possible quotes are escaped with a backslash.

If this keyword is given only one argument and that is a list like object, then the values of that list are joined instead.

Example:

${cmd} = Join Command Line --option value with spaces
Should Be Equal ${cmd} --option "value with spaces"

New in Robot Framework 2.9.2.

Process Should Be Running

Arguments

  • handle=None
  • error_message=Process is not running.

Verifies that the process is running.

If handle is not given, uses the current active process.

Fails if the process has stopped.

Process Should Be Stopped

Arguments

  • handle=None
  • error_message=Process is running.

Verifies that the process is not running.

If handle is not given, uses the current active process.

Fails if the process is still running.

Run Process

Arguments

  • command
  • *arguments
  • **configuration

Runs a process and waits for it to complete.

command and *arguments specify the command to execute and arguments passed to it. See Specifying command and arguments for more details.

**configuration contains additional configuration related to starting processes and waiting for them to finish. See Process configuration for more details about configuration related to starting processes. Configuration related to waiting for processes consists of timeout and on_timeout arguments that have same semantics as with Wait For Process keyword. By default there is no timeout, and if timeout is defined the default action on timeout is terminate.

Returns a result object containing information about the execution.

Note that possible equal signs in *arguments must be escaped with a backslash (e.g. name\=value) to avoid them to be passed in as **configuration.

Examples:

${result} = Run Process python -c print 'Hello, world!'
Should Be Equal ${result.stdout} Hello, world!
${result} = Run Process ${command} stderr=STDOUT timeout=10s
${result} = Run Process ${command} timeout=1min on_timeout=continue
${result} = Run Process java -Dname\=value Example shell=True cwd=${EXAMPLE}

This keyword does not change the active process.

Send Signal To Process

Arguments

  • signal
  • handle=None
  • group=False

Sends the given signal to the specified process.

If handle is not given, uses the current active process.

Signal can be specified either as an integer as a signal name. In the latter case it is possible to give the name both with or without SIG prefix, but names are case-sensitive. For example, all the examples below send signal INT (2):

Send Signal To Process 2 # Send to active process
Send Signal To Process INT
Send Signal To Process SIGINT myproc # Send to named process

This keyword is only supported on Unix-like machines, not on Windows. What signals are supported depends on the system. For a list of existing signals on your system, see the Unix man pages related to signal handling (typically man signal or man 7 signal).

By default sends the signal only to the parent process, not to possible child processes started by it. Notice that when running processes in shell, the shell is the parent process and it depends on the system does the shell propagate the signal to the actual started process.

To send the signal to the whole process group, group argument can be set to any true value (see Boolean arguments). This is not supported by Jython, however.

Split Command Line

Arguments

  • args
  • escaping=False

Splits command line string into a list of arguments.

String is split from spaces, but argument surrounded in quotes may contain spaces in them. If escaping is given a true value, then backslash is treated as an escape character. It can escape unquoted spaces, quotes inside quotes, and so on, but it also requires using double backslashes when using Windows paths.

Examples:

@{cmd} = Split Command Line --option "value with spaces"
Should Be True $cmd == ['--option', 'value with spaces']

New in Robot Framework 2.9.2.

Start Process

Arguments

  • command
  • *arguments
  • **configuration

Starts a new process on background.

See Specifying command and arguments and Process configuration for more information about the arguments, and Run Process keyword for related examples.

Makes the started process new active process. Returns an identifier that can be used as a handle to activate the started process if needed.

Processes are started so that they create a new process group. This allows sending signals to and terminating also possible child processes. This is not supported on Jython.

Switch Process

Arguments

  • handle

Makes the specified process the current active process.

The handle can be an identifier returned by Start Process or the alias given to it explicitly.

Example:

Start Process prog1 alias=process1
Start Process prog2 alias=process2
# currently active process is process2
Switch Process process1
# now active process is process1

Terminate All Processes

Arguments

  • kill=False

Terminates all still running processes started by this library.

This keyword can be used in suite teardown or elsewhere to make sure that all processes are stopped,

By default tries to terminate processes gracefully, but can be configured to forcefully kill them immediately. See Terminate Process that this keyword uses internally for more details.

Terminate Process

Arguments

  • handle=None
  • kill=False

Stops the process gracefully or forcefully.

If handle is not given, uses the current active process.

By default first tries to stop the process gracefully. If the process does not stop in 30 seconds, or kill argument is given a true value, (see Boolean arguments) kills the process forcefully. Stops also all the child processes of the originally started process.

Waits for the process to stop after terminating it. Returns a result object containing information about the execution similarly as Wait For Process.

On Unix-like machines graceful termination is done using TERM (15) signal and killing using KILL (9). Use Send Signal To Process instead if you just want to send either of these signals without waiting for the process to stop.

On Windows graceful termination is done using CTRL_BREAK_EVENT event and killing using Win32 API function TerminateProcess().

Examples:

${result} = Terminate Process
Should Be Equal As Integers ${result.rc} -15 # On Unixes
Terminate Process myproc kill=true

Limitations:

  • Graceful termination is not supported on Windows when using Jython. Process is killed instead.
  • Stopping the whole process group is not supported when using Jython.
  • On Windows forceful kill only stops the main process, not possible child processes.

Wait For Process

Arguments

  • handle=None
  • timeout=None
  • on_timeout=continue

Waits for the process to complete or to reach the given timeout.

The process to wait for must have been started earlier with Start Process. If handle is not given, uses the current active process.

timeout defines the maximum time to wait for the process. It can be given in various time formats supported by Robot Framework, for example, 42, 42 s, or 1 minute 30 seconds. The timeout is ignored if it is Python None (default), string NONE (case-insensitively), zero, or negative.

on_timeout defines what to do if the timeout occurs. Possible values and corresponding actions are explained in the table below. Notice that reaching the timeout never fails the test.

Value Action
continue The process is left running (default).
terminate The process is gracefully terminated.
kill The process is forcefully stopped.

See Terminate Process keyword for more details how processes are terminated and killed.

If the process ends before the timeout or it is terminated or killed, this keyword returns a result object containing information about the execution. If the process is left running, Python None is returned instead.

Examples:

# Process ends cleanly
${result} = Wait For Process example
Process Should Be Stopped example
Should Be Equal As Integers ${result.rc} 0
# Process does not end
${result} = Wait For Process timeout=42 secs
Process Should Be Running
Should Be Equal ${result} ${NONE}
# Kill non-ending process
${result} = Wait For Process timeout=1min 30s on_timeout=kill
Process Should Be Stopped
Should Be Equal As Integers ${result.rc} -9

Ignoring timeout if it is string NONE, zero, or negative is new in Robot Framework 3.2.